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March 2015 Archives

Texas pet trusts for our furry (or scaly) little friends

Whether you have a parrot, a cat, a dog or an iguana, you may have some very real concerns about your pet's future and how your pet will be taken care of after you are gone. This is where pet trusts can help. Indeed, considering how much people love their pets, is not uncommon for a specially designed pet trust to be the most important part of a Texas resident's estate plan.

Texas residents should take note when attempting estate planning

Many in Texas and elsewhere thrive on the challenge of taking care of household projects and repairs themselves in an attempt to save on the costs they might incur if hiring a professional. Some have a similar mindset where finances and estate planning are concerned. A recent article suggested caution in this area and outlined the pros and cons of do-it-yourself planning when it comes to trusts, wills and estates.

Estate administration follows the legal rules of probate

After all is said and done in the way of estate planning, and with necessary modifications along the way, the day will come when the loved one's decedent estate will have to be administered. If a proper will was made during the planning process, the first official step of estate administration in Texas and other states will be to file the will at the probate court. At that time, the person named in the will as the personal representative will present the will to the probate clerk and take the oath of office.

Texas residents' questions about estate planning answered

Texas residents who have yet to create an estate plan will no doubt have a lot of questions about the estate planning process. Indeed, you might even be wondering what estate planning is or why you even need an estate plan. To answer this question, one should address the basics. Estate planning helps ensure that the final wishes you have for your health and property are honored when you are not able to communicate those wishes -- either due to your incapacitation or death.